wetheurban:

SPOTLIGHT: T(ex)ting by Lora Mathis & Kasey Reinbold

Right in the feels! T(ex)ting is a series that explores how the termination of a relationship interrupts routine, and how technology’s capacity to convert the emotional to the tangible (in the form of archived text messages) can prolong the healing process that follows a break-up. More after the jump:

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huffingtonpost:

This Man With Severe Cerebral Palsy Created Mind-Blowing Art Using Just A Typewriter

Last year, 22-time Emmy award-winning reporter John Stofflet posted this news video he created for KING-TV in 2004, featuring Paul Smith and his artistic talents.

See the full video to see more of Smith’s artworks and to learn more about his inspiring story go here. 

archiemcphee:

Stephanie Fernendez is a self-taught freelance makeup artist located in Shreveport, Louisiana who specializes in creating impressively freaky and vibrant transformations. We love the many ways she turns her own mouth into a horrifying gaping maw or disturbingly toothy grin.

Check out Stephanie’s website and Facebook page for more amazing photos.

[via Geekologie]

rfmmsd:

Artist:
Hae Jung 
"Tragically Satisfied"
Mixed Media on Paper
17” x 22.5” Inches
2013

rfmmsd:

Artist:

Hae Jung 

"Tragically Satisfied"

Mixed Media on Paper

17” x 22.5” Inches

2013

(Source: justhaejunglee.com)

archiemcphee:

70-year-old Xu Shuquan is a retired primary school teacher from the city of Chengdu in Sichuan province who has spent the past 60 years practicing Zhezhi, the traditional Chinese art of paper folding. Shugan has been folding paper planes since he was 10 years old and has amassed an awesome collection of 10,000 paper planes of various sizes, shapes and colors. Unlike Japanese origami, which primarily focuses on creating animals and flowers, Chinese paper folding concentrates mainly on objects, such as boats, hats, or in this case, airplanes.

…Xu put his knowledge of Zhezhi to good use during his teaching career: “When children were naughty or not paying attention, I would get their attention by folding a simple paper dart with a message on it and flying it to them,” he said. “The planes got more and more complicated and the children seemed to love them.” The trick would backfire at times because his students loved the planes so much that they would create a ruckus on purpose.

Shuquan hopes to hold an exhibition of his Zhezhi creations in hopes of reviving an art form which he feels has been eclipsed in the western world by Japanese origami.

“My biggest hope is to hold my own exhibition where people can learn more about the traditional art.”

[via Oddity Central]

bear1na:

Art by Chiara Bautista

bear1na:

Art by Chiara Bautista

gameraboy:

Cover to “A Touch of Myrrh” (1974) by Harry Barton

gameraboy:

Cover to “A Touch of Myrrh” (1974) by Harry Barton

mayahan:

Hikari Shimoda

artagainstsociety:

super rabbitby kolyabilan